User Tools

Site Tools


wiki:music:taggingguide

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
wiki:music:taggingguide [2019/06/11 16:21]
dizwell [4.8 Genre]
wiki:music:taggingguide [2019/06/11 16:24] (current)
dizwell [4.10 Album Art]
Line 166: Line 166:
 The point is that the image displayed by your music player when you're listening to your music is actually rather more important than most people realise -so use whatever album art makes most sense to you in that context. The point is that the image displayed by your music player when you're listening to your music is actually rather more important than most people realise -so use whatever album art makes most sense to you in that context.
  
-In all cases, whatever image you decide should represent the album art for a track, please **embed** the art within the digital music file, which essentially means using a third-party music tagger program such as Puddletag or Easytag ​to upload the album art in the form of a jpeg or png file into the track'​s own Album Art tag. Do not leave album art files sitting around on your file system as separate graphics files: make them become part of the music file itself. This will make the music file a bit larger than it otherwise would be, but the increase amounts to only a few Gigabytes on a huge music collection, so isn't really significant. Meanwhile, once it's part of the music file, your album art will always '​travel'​ with your music, without the danger of it being over-written or corrupted.+In all cases, whatever image you decide should represent the album art for a track, please **embed** the art within the digital music file, which essentially means using a third-party music tagger program such as [[wiki:​software:​ccdt|The Classical CD Tagger]] ​to upload the album art in the form of a jpeg or png file into the track'​s own Album Art tag. Do not leave album art files sitting around on your file system as separate graphics files: make them become part of the music file itself. This will make the music file a bit larger than it otherwise would be, but the increase amounts to only a few Gigabytes on a huge music collection, so isn't really significant. Meanwhile, once it's part of the music file, your album art will always '​travel'​ with your music, without the danger of it being over-written or corrupted.
  
 For the same reason, avoid the use of graphics files stored within the music folder called "​folder.jpg"​. Many music players/​managers will read and display such files, sometimes even in preference to art that is embedded within a music file. Many will go one step further and //update// such '​folder.jpg'​ files without too much manual intervention on your part -at which point, your album art won't be anything that you recognise or see much meaning in. For the same reason, avoid the use of graphics files stored within the music folder called "​folder.jpg"​. Many music players/​managers will read and display such files, sometimes even in preference to art that is embedded within a music file. Many will go one step further and //update// such '​folder.jpg'​ files without too much manual intervention on your part -at which point, your album art won't be anything that you recognise or see much meaning in.
  
 So: the short version is, make your album art large, good quality, meaningful to you ...and **always** embed it, rather than leaving it as discrete graphics files. So: the short version is, make your album art large, good quality, meaningful to you ...and **always** embed it, rather than leaving it as discrete graphics files.
wiki/music/taggingguide.txt ยท Last modified: 2019/06/11 16:24 by dizwell