User Tools

Site Tools


blog:upgrade_time

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
blog:upgrade_time [2019/05/18 15:06]
dizwell
blog:upgrade_time [2019/05/18 15:08] (current)
dizwell
Line 20: Line 20:
 As it turns out, the 45W CPU is **almost** 35W, enough so anyway that when I checked the CPU temperatures under load, the temperatures were not outrageous: I forgot to take a detailed note, but from memory, I was pegging around 58°C after 30 minutes of 100% CPU utilisation for all 8 threads, which compared relatively favourably to the original Celeron'​s approximately 46°C. Clearly the extra wattage of the new CPU results in a hefty temperature rise of around 12°C, but the result is not anywhere near toasty temperature levels that would cause real concern. So the 45W CPU can run as it is, with no further concerns or consideration. As it turns out, the 45W CPU is **almost** 35W, enough so anyway that when I checked the CPU temperatures under load, the temperatures were not outrageous: I forgot to take a detailed note, but from memory, I was pegging around 58°C after 30 minutes of 100% CPU utilisation for all 8 threads, which compared relatively favourably to the original Celeron'​s approximately 46°C. Clearly the extra wattage of the new CPU results in a hefty temperature rise of around 12°C, but the result is not anywhere near toasty temperature levels that would cause real concern. So the 45W CPU can run as it is, with no further concerns or consideration.
  
-But the E3-1230 V2 was another matter. After its 30 minutes of 100% utilisation,​ that CPU was clocked at 86°C, which is a degree or so //above// the point where it's automatically throttled back to lower speeds (ambient temperature in my study, where I tested these things, was always around 22°C). ​Whilst ​I don't ever expect these servers to be continually stressed like that in day-to-day operation, it was a problem I wanted ​to avoid if possible.+But the E3-1230 V2 was another matter. After its 30 minutes of 100% utilisation,​ that CPU was clocked at a rather scary 86°C, which is a degree or so //above// the point where it's automatically throttled back to lower, slower ​speeds (ambient temperature in my study, where I tested these things, was always around 22°C, by the way). It is true that I don't ever expect these servers to be continually stressed like that in day-to-day operation; nevertheless such a high operating temperature under load seemed to me a problem I'd like to avoid if at all possible.
  
-So I bought two of [[https://​www.amazon.co.uk/​Evercool-30mm-Volt-Case-EC3007H12EA/​dp/​B01CAYBZHU|these things]]:+So I visited Amazon and bought two of [[https://​www.amazon.co.uk/​Evercool-30mm-Volt-Case-EC3007H12EA/​dp/​B01CAYBZHU|these things]]:
  
 {{ :​blog:​smallfan.jpg?​direct&​300 |}} {{ :​blog:​smallfan.jpg?​direct&​300 |}}
  
-It's a tiny -and I mean that's it's only about as big as the first joint of your thumb- 12 volt fan. It is //fairly// quiet in operation and pushes a reasonable amount of air around. I glued both of them to the passive heatsink, like so:+It's a tiny -and I mean that's it's only about as big as the first joint of your thumb, so really very petite- 12 volt fan. It is //fairly// quiet in operation and pushes a reasonable amount of air around. I glued both of them to the passive heatsink, like so:
  
 {{ :​blog:​motherboard_with_fans.jpg?​direct&​400 |}} {{ :​blog:​motherboard_with_fans.jpg?​direct&​400 |}}
  
-...and wired them into the existing tangle of molex cables, making sure that they blew air towards the back of the case, where the giant built-in fan is waiting to expell it into the great outdoors! After another 30 minutes at 100% utilisation,​ I was recording temperatures of around 80°C, which wasn't a spectacular improvement,​ but 6°C means the CPU wasn't being throttled any more and was a temperature I could (just about) live with.+...and wired them into the existing tangle of molex cables, making sure that they blew air towards the back of the case, where the giant built-in fan is waiting to expell it all into the great outdoors! After another 30 minutes at 100% utilisation,​ I was recording temperatures of around 80°C, which wasn't a spectacular improvement,​ but 6°C means the CPU wasn't being throttled any more and was a temperature I could (just about) live with.
  
 But whilst the HP BIOS on this server is configured to run the main system fan in '​optimal mode' by default (which means it just purrs quietly in the background!),​ there is an option to bump that up to '​Increased'​ or '​Maximum Cooling'​. I therefore decided to go all-in and switched on '​Maximum Cooling'​ mode and re-ran my temperature tests. The gentle purr of optimal cooling gave way to a server-room-like roar in maximum mode, but I ended up with temperatures of around 71°C, which is an excellent result. Presumably, without the little fans mounted on the CPU, I might have been able to achieve 77°C or so anyway, just by bumping up the built-in fan capabilities,​ but the extra 6°C from the purchased micro-fans is appreciated anyway. But whilst the HP BIOS on this server is configured to run the main system fan in '​optimal mode' by default (which means it just purrs quietly in the background!),​ there is an option to bump that up to '​Increased'​ or '​Maximum Cooling'​. I therefore decided to go all-in and switched on '​Maximum Cooling'​ mode and re-ran my temperature tests. The gentle purr of optimal cooling gave way to a server-room-like roar in maximum mode, but I ended up with temperatures of around 71°C, which is an excellent result. Presumably, without the little fans mounted on the CPU, I might have been able to achieve 77°C or so anyway, just by bumping up the built-in fan capabilities,​ but the extra 6°C from the purchased micro-fans is appreciated anyway.
blog/upgrade_time.txt · Last modified: 2019/05/18 15:08 by dizwell